Increased Job Demand for Games Design Development Professionals in Malaysia

Job demand increasing in Malaysia for Games Design and Animation Professionals

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The local multimedia industry seeks to equip its graduates with digital literacy that encompasses both theory and practical experience.

Malaysians have been playing a part in making some of the best games and movies around. Titles such as Call Of Duty: Ghosts, Fifa 14, NBA 2K14, Race Driver: Grid, Life Of Pi, X-Men: First Class and Snow White And The Huntsman all have traces of local involvement.

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Increased Demand for Computer Games in the World thereby Increasing Demand for Qualified Games Design Graduates from Top Universities in Malaysia

KDU University College offers the degree in Games Development. Students have access to Alienware in their Game Lab.

KDU University College offers the degree in Games Development. Students have access to Alienware in their Game Lab.

The worldwide video game marketplace, which includes video game console hardware and software, online, mobile and PC games, reached $93 billion in 2013, up from $79 billion in 2012, according to Gartner, Inc. Driven by strong mobile gaming and video game console and software sales, the market is forecast to reach $111 billion by 2015.

Mobile games are the fastest-growing segment of the market, with revenue set to nearly double between 2013 and 2015 from $13.2 billion to $22 billion.

“As mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) continue to grow, the mobile game category will show the biggest growth due to the entertainment value provided by games compared with other app categories,” said Brian Blau, research director at Gartner.

“This growth is fueled by healthy premium mobile device sales globally and a desire by consumers to play games on these multifunction

After I finished my SPM, I felt confused about my further study. Because of Eduspiral, I am able to pursue my studies at Asia Pacific University. Eduspiral, was so patient to answer all my questions and even brought me to visit the university when I went to KL alone. Jeremy Lee, APU scholarship student

After I finished my SPM, I felt confused about my further study. Because of Eduspiral, I am able to pursue my studies at Asia Pacific University. Eduspiral, was so patient to answer all my questions and even brought me to visit the university when I went to KL alone. Jeremy Lee, APU scholarship student

devices that are capable of displaying increasingly sophisticated game content.”

According to PWC, Mobile is delivering a new generation of gamers.Global mobile games revenue is forecast to reach US$15bn in 2018, rising at a CAGR of 9.6%. China, Japan and the US are key markets. Only advertising revenue, which is still relatively small, will grow at a faster rate within the video games segment.

Rising smartphone ownership is increasing access to mobile games globally and has enabled innovation in gameplay and business models.

However, production values are very high and costs of development are rising partly due to heavy demand, lack of specialized and qualified skilled workers, and the pressure to deliver more within an increasingly shorter amount of time.

Hence, there is a need for people who are trained and competent in the workflow of Game Development

The new Games Design Lab and its accompanying Games Lounge, both costing some RM300,000 invested by KDU College Penang.

The new Games Design Lab and its accompanying Games Lounge, both costing some RM300,000 invested by KDU College Penang.

with very specialized fields of study.

Games technology covers a wide area that includes simulation, programming and adventure features for use in areas such as entertainment, gaming and multimedia. If you’re looking for a career that combines creativity and technical IT skills, then this course is perfect for you, as you will be able to explore games as both a technical and an entertainment medium.

The Industry is growing at an incredible rate and shows no sign of ever slowing down. Almost everyone plays games in some form.

Computer Games Industry Growth in Malaysia

Game Lab equipped with Alienware for the Game Technology degree students

Game Lab equipped with Alienware for the Game Technology degree students

Malaysia has about 700 people currently employed in the games industry, a figure that is hoped to grow considerably in the coming years. Moreover, the country is home to companies that produce a sizeable amount of content.

The video games market in Malaysia is poised to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.8% between 2011 and 2015.

Growth will be supported by the growing spending on game applications, especially social and mobile gaming, which will be four times more than spending on music.

According to industry observers, the platform has undergone a lot of growth that there is tremendous opportunity in the mobile and social game monetisation space.

The International Game Developers Association (IGDA), Malaysia, lists up to 48 game companies, 10 of which engage in co-production with foreign partners. Employment is on-going both for the technically-inclined as well as for those in design, marketing and business backgrounds.

The Game Industry is ever expanding and opportunities is endless. South-East Asia is now a   hotbed of potential and many companies ranging from mobile app developers, indie game developers to triple-AAA studios are seeing that and setting up shop

EduSpiral took my father & I to visit KDU University College and talk to the Game Technology lecturer & Head. I was able to make a good decision in choosing the right university. Choon Meng, Game Technology at KDU University College

EduSpiral took my father & I to visit KDU University College and talk to the Game Technology lecturer & Head. I was able to make a good decision in choosing the right university.
Choon Meng, Game Technology at KDU University College

within the region.

MULTIMEDIA Development Corp (MDeC) aims to make Malaysia the regional hub for games and interactive media within the next three years due to the explosive growth in the business.

According to the 2014 global games report, the international games market will breach the US$100 billion (RM350 billion) mark before hitting US$102.9 billion by 2017.

This represents a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.1 percent, outstripping the previous year’s estimate due to the relentless growth of both Asian markets and mobile gaming, said MDeC chief executive officer Datuk Yasmin Mahmood.

“This is indeed an exciting prospect for all of us, especially to the growth of the games industry,” she said at the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between creative animation studio, Lemon Sky Animation Sdn Bhd, with Bandai Namco Studios Singapore Pte Ltd.

The Malaysian creative content industry is estimated to be worth RM10 billion.

The creative multimedia cluster alone recorded RM6.39 billion inrevenue last year and created over 10,000 jobs. Investment grew by 16 per cent to RM470 million from 2012.

DIZZYING HEIGHTS: Lemon Sky Games & Animation handled part of the art design for 2013's hit Call of Duty: Ghosts.

DIZZYING HEIGHTS: Lemon Sky Games & Animation handled part of the art design for 2013’s hit Call of Duty: Ghosts.

Yasmin said there were currently 330 local creative multimedia content companies and over 50 Multimedia Super Corridor-status creative firms involved in game-related development activities.

She said an action plan was in place to bring foreign anchor game companies and publishers here to collaborate with the local players to develop the industry.

“We already have great industry players and many more talents coming in into the industry. With the local talent pool primed and ready for games development art and designs, we have the strong potential to create a good eco-system for the hub,” she said.

On the partnership between Bandai Namco and Lemon Sky, Yasmin said it showed the growth of Malaysian creative content industry and its potential to develop into a world-class creative hub.

“It will undoubtedly propel the local games industry to greater heights. The partnerships will see new series of projects that Bandai Namco has planned with Lemon Sky next year and expand the latter’s services into full-fledged game development,” she said.

Lemon Sky’s chief executive officer Cheng Fei Wong said the agreements would hopefully encourage other players in the industry to penetrate the global market and view the industry as positive in the coming years.

Lemon Sky Games & Animation worked on the art design for Ghosts, Fifa 14 and NBA 2K14, Codemasters Studios handled parts of Grid and Rhythm & Hues made some of the most spectacular visual effects for box-office hits Life Of Pi, X-Men: First Class andSnow White And The Huntsman.

DIZZYING HEIGHTS: Lemon Sky Games & Animation handled part of the art design for 2013’s hit Call of Duty: Ghosts.

Meanwhile, Les’ Copaque Production’s Upin & Ipin and Animonsta Studios’ BoBoiBoyare big hits here and even have regional following with fans in Indonesia.

There is little doubt that the creative multimedia industry has become a lucrative market – as of 2013, the sector recorded a total revenue of RM6.39bil with export sales amounting to RM430mil, according to the Multimedia Development Corporation (MDeC).
MDeC, which has been tasked to grow the sector, says as of last year there are 334 active companies responsible for over 10,000 jobs nationwide.

Malaysia has been involved in the animation industry as far back as the 1980s, and with the gaming industry as far back as the 1990s, said Tan Chin Ike, head of school for KDU University College’s School of Computing & Creative Media.

Local companies have worked on projects for platforms such as Nintendo Game Boy Advance, Color and DS handheld gaming systems, as well as the Sony PlayStation console. With so much already under its belt, one would think that the multimedia industry is bursting at the seams, but key industry players feel there are still many hurdles to overcome.

Games Industry in need of qualified and well trained professionals from top universities

If Malaysia wants to go further and be the games development hub for the region, it needs to have a critical mass of skilled

KDU University College uses state-of-the-art Dell Alienware machines in its lab to educate students on game development and keep them abreast of all the latest technologies.

KDU University College uses state-of-the-art Dell Alienware machines in its lab to educate students on game development and keep them abreast of all the latest technologies.

people, says Tan.

To achieve this, private universities in Malaysia are key in nurturing game technology talents. Asia Pacific University, KDU University College Utropolis Glenmarie , KDU University College Penang and HELP University are just some of the higher learning centres offering various IT courses to cater to this market.

However, too many students are enrolling for generic IT courses that allow them the flexibility of choice or because it’s an easier option, says Tan.

This has resulted in the number of students learning computer science or proficient in programming, logic and algorithms dropping significantly over the years.

The reality is that we want specialists or at least people with the propensity to code well and problem-solve, he says.
“C++ is one of the crucial programming languages but the honest truth is we want programmers who are grounded in fundamentals so that they can easily adapt and move between languages,” he says.

“Technology changes rapidly – graduates should be agile enough to adapt and move on as well.”

Tan, who is also the chairman of MyGameDev2020, an Entry Point Project under the Economic Transformation Programme for nurturing skilled talents in games development, says that a big company (which he declined to name) was here recently to set up a game development studio and it was not concerned about incentives or infrastructure but rather th e talent pool that would be available to it.

Exposure and experience in the games industry in Malaysia

Lemon Sky Games & Animation chief executive officer Wong Cheng Fei says there is a shortage of 3D animators and 3D modellers and the studio has been hiring foreign talents to fill the gaps. He also concurs with Tan that our graduates are not trained to handle coding, especially when working on big intellectual properties, as they have no working experience.

The lack of working experience is not just a problem with students but also lecturers. Les’ Copaque technical director Syed Nurfaiz Khalid says not all education providers have lecturers with industry exposure.

In fact, some universities tend to hire their own students as lecturers after they graduate. This is not necessarily a bad thing but they may have a limited amount of knowledge to impart to their students due to lack of experience.

Learning the theory isn’t everything, as practical know-how is equally important for animators, says Syed.

Education is crucial to gain the insight and knowledge on how the industry works but the onus is on the graduates to improve their skills and portfolio of work, says Les’ Copaque production director Yuki Tang Ying Sowk.

Many are not ready for the working world and need to be retrained upon entering the industry, she says.

In fact, they are not even aware that there are many areas of specialisation for animation until they come on board.

Les’ Copaque provides basic training to all new recruits so that they are familiar with the entire work process, as it has eight sections handling various animation works.

After the one-month training, most graduates will be able to handle basic animation works, says Tang.

The industry is highly competitive and most companies are looking for the cream of the crop, he says.

“Most companies want graduates who can immediately make the transition from academics to actual application because they want to avoid spending money and resource in training them if possible,” he says.

Finding a balance

Although doubts have been raised about the product of our higher education system, it’s hard to deny that the local industry has benefitted from the inception of the Multimedia Super Corridor back in 1996.

The general perception that the problem facing the industry is about mismatch of graduates’ skillsets is not entirely true, says MDeC director of creative multimedia division Hasnul Hadi Samsudin.

Hasnul, one of the founding members of MDeC, worked on Life of Pi while he was with Rhythm and Hues. He says we need successful companies and role models to encourage more talents to be a part of the creative multimedia industry.

“Actually it’s not a mismatch of skills but a mismatch of expectations,” he says.

“It’s very much a chicken and egg situation. Most say it’s the fault of our education system but on the other hand it’s also a matter of opportunity,” said Hasnul.

“We need more successful companies and role models to encourage people to want to be part of the industry,” he says.

Les’ Copaque, Animonsta Studios, FM Media, Azim Hulaimi (who was previously with Rhythm & Hues) and renowned independent filmmakers such as Liew Seng Tat and Tan Chui Mui are all proof that we have quality talents

Games Industry in need of qualified and well trained professionals from top universities

If Malaysia wants to go further and be the games development hub for the region, it needs to have a critical mass of skilled

KDU University College uses state-of-the-art Dell Alienware machines in its lab to educate students on game development and keep them abreast of all the latest technologies.

KDU University College uses state-of-the-art Dell Alienware machines in its lab to educate students on game development and keep them abreast of all the latest technologies.

people, says Tan.

To achieve this, private universities in Malaysia are key in nurturing game technology talents. Asia Pacific University, KDU University College , KDU College Penang and HELP University are just some of the higher learning centres offering various IT courses to cater to this market.

However, too many students are enrolling for generic IT courses that allow them the flexibility of choice or because it’s an easier option, says Tan.

This has resulted in the number of students learning computer science or proficient in programming, logic and algorithms dropping significantly over the years.

The reality is that we want specialists or at least people with the propensity to code well and problem-solve, he says.
“C++ is one of the crucial programming languages but the honest truth is we want programmers who are grounded in fundamentals so that they can easily adapt and move between languages,” he says.

“Technology changes rapidly – graduates should be agile enough to adapt and move on as well.”

Tan, who is also the chairman of MyGameDev2020, an Entry Point Project under the Economic Transformation Programme for nurturing skilled talents in games development, says that a big company (which he declined to name) was here recently to set up a game development studio and it was not concerned about incentives or infrastructure but rather th e talent pool that would be available to it.

Exposure and experience in the games industry in Malaysia

Graduates from Asia Pacific University will receive a UK Dual Award degree from Staffordshire University. An impressive 95% of APU's graduates obtain jobs before graduation.

Graduates from Asia Pacific University will receive a UK Dual Award degree from Staffordshire University. An impressive 95% of APU’s graduates obtain jobs before graduation.

Lemon Sky Games & Animation chief executive officer Wong Cheng Fei says there is a shortage of 3D animators and 3D modellers and the studio has been hiring foreign talents to fill the gaps. He also concurs with Tan that our graduates are not trained to handle coding, especially when working on big intellectual properties, as they have no working experience. The lack of working experience is not just a problem with students but also lecturers.

Les’ Copaque technical director Syed Nurfaiz Khalid says not all education providers have lecturers with industry exposure. In fact, some universities tend to hire their own students as lecturers after they graduate. This is not necessarily a bad thing but they may have a limited amount of knowledge to impart to their students due to lack of experience.

Learning the theory isn’t everything, as practical know-how is equally important for animators, says Syed. Education is crucial to gain the insight and knowledge on how the industry works but the onus is on the graduates to improve their skills and portfolio of work, says Les’ Copaque production director Yuki Tang Ying Sowk.

Many are not ready for the working world and need to be retrained upon entering the industry, she says. In

I was lost in choosing the right course. My dad contacted EduSpiral to talk to me. He listened to me & guided me to make the right choice. Hubert, Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University

I was lost in choosing the right course. My dad contacted EduSpiral to talk to me. He listened to me & guided me to make the right choice.
Hubert, Software Engineering at Asia Pacific University

fact, they are not even aware that there are many areas of specialisation for animation until they come on board.

Les’ Copaque provides basic training to all new recruits so that they are familiar with the entire work process, as it has eight sections handling various animation works. After the one-month training, most graduates will be able to handle basic animation works, says Tang. The industry is highly competitive and most companies are looking for the cream of the crop, he says.

“Most companies want graduates who can immediately make the transition from academics to actual application because they want to avoid spending money and resource in training them if possible,” he says.

Starting salary for games development and animation fresh graduates in Malaysia

A graduate with a degree in games development can expect to earn an average of RM2,000 to RM2,400 upon entering the

KDU University College Utropolis Glenmarie Campus

KDU University College Utropolis Glenmarie Campus

industry.

The rate is slightly lower for graduates in animation — they can expect to get about RM1,600 to RM2,200, depending on the studio.

KDU’s Tan says most graduates have unrealistic expectations and expect to earn at least RM2,400 upon entering the industry even without having to work overtime or on weekends.

From the company’s perspective, a fresh graduate with little or no experience is not very valuable because he or she is an unproven element and can’t demand such high salaries.

They also may not be able to handle the workload, he says. Even large animation companies have low starting rates, as they want the graduates to work their way up the ladder before they can be paid more.

Les’ Copaque’s Tang also says that most graduates today want big money for less effort.
“The current generation also has commitment and discipline issues,” she says.

However that has not stopped the studio from hiring fresh graduates. Les’ Copaque, which is one of the

Asia Pacific University's Studio is well-equipped with Alienware Destop PC

Asia Pacific University’s Studio is well-equipped with Alienware Destop PC

largest animation studios in Malaysia, has over 160 employees and up to 80% are fresh graduates. But nothing is set in stone and some graduates with better portfolios have been hired with a starting salary of RM2,800 to RM3,000, Tan says.

Also, while graduates are expected to have an appropriate degree, most animation studios are willing to consider even those with totally different backgrounds.

Tang says the studio has even hired those with engineering and aerospace qualifications.
“On top of passion and technical know-how, animators need to have acting skills because they need to be able to act out what they intend to animate,” says Tang.

However, most universities do not place enough emphasis on this, she says.

Another skill they need to have is the ability to present an idea or work properly, as this is vital for working

Asia Pacific University's Studio is well-equipped with Alienware Destop PC

Asia Pacific University’s Studio is well-equipped with Alienware Destop PC

in teams. While ensuring that we have a ready supply of qualified graduates, the industry also needs to find a way to retain talents. Our talents are in high demand and many of them head to Singapore for better opportunities, says Tan.

“Medical, engineering and accountancy are often cited as the main professions suffering from brain drain but the creative multimedia industry also faces a similar situation here,” he says.

For example, the workforce of Ubisoft Singapore — the French gaming giant’s Asian office — is made up of about 20% to 30% Malaysians, says Tan.

That’s why many local studios resort to hiring foreigners in the end to fill up their vacancies, he says.

“The simple truth is we need to attract bigger companies to Malaysia. Talents leave because they want bigger and better challenges,” he says.

“They want to push the envelope of development and work on huge game titles. Malaysians in Singapore will eventually leave the island for bigger companies. It’s one of the realities of the industry.”

Finding a balance

Although doubts have been raised about the product of our higher education system, it’s hard to deny that the local industry has

EduSpiral met us at Asia Pacific University to explain in detail about the computing courses and took us around for a campus tour. Jack Chin from Sitiawan

EduSpiral met us at Asia Pacific University to explain in detail about the computing courses and took us around for a campus tour.
Jack Chin from Sitiawan

benefitted from the inception of the Multimedia Super Corridor back in 1996.

The general perception that the problem facing the industry is about mismatch of graduates’ skillsets is not entirely true, says MDeC director of creative multimedia division Hasnul Hadi Samsudin.

Hasnul, one of the founding members of MDeC, worked on Life of Pi while he was with Rhythm and Hues. He says we need successful companies and role models to encourage more talents to be a part of the creative multimedia industry.

“Actually it’s not a mismatch of skills but a mismatch of expectations,” he says.

“It’s very much a chicken and egg situation. Most say it’s the fault of our education system but on the other hand it’s also a matter of opportunity,” said Hasnul.

“We need more successful companies and role models to encourage people to want to be part of the industry,” he says.

Les’ Copaque, Animonsta Studios, FM Media, Azim Hulaimi (who was previously with Rhythm & Hues) and renowned independent filmmakers such as Liew Seng Tat and Tan Chui Mui are all proof that we have quality talents

Demand for well trained specialists in Game Technology in Malaysia

The new Games Design Lab and its accompanying Games Lounge, both costing some RM300,000 invested by KDU College Penang.

The new Games Design Lab and its accompanying Games Lounge, both costing some RM300,000 invested by KDU College Penang.

However, production values are very high and costs of development are rising partly due to heavy demand, lack of specialized and qualified skilled workers, and the pressure to deliver more within an increasingly shorter amount of time.

Hence, there is a need for people who are trained and competent in the workflow of Game Development with very specialized fields of study.

Games technology covers a wide area that includes simulation, programming and adventure features for use in areas such as entertainment, gaming and multimedia. If you’re looking for a career that combines creativity and technical IT skills, then this course is perfect for you, as you will be able to explore games as both a technical and an entertainment medium.

The Industry is growing at an incredible rate and shows no sign of ever slowing down. Almost everyone plays games in some form

Great potential for game developers
Great potential for game developers

or another whether on the PC, console or on their mobile devices. The Game Industry is generating more revenue than any

KDU University College uses state-of-the-art Dell Alienware machines in its lab to educate students on game development and keep them abreast of all the latest technologies.

KDU University College uses state-of-the-art Dell Alienware machines in its lab to educate students on game development and keep them abreast of all the latest technologies.

other entertainment medium out there so the potential for game developers out there are enormous and is constantly growing daily!

Game developers are amongst the most highly skilled creative talent out there in the creative industry.

To be a successful game developer, one not only has to figure out the problems of making a fun and entertaining game but also has to solve the complex production and marketing problems related to the industry.

In order to gain the necessary skills to succeed in the competitive gaming industry, students should choose the best university in Malaysia for computer games design or game development to study at.

CAREER OPTIONS

  • Game Art: Concept Artist, 2D Game Artist, 3D Game Artist, Level Artist, SFX Artist
  • Game Design: Game Designer, Level Designer, Story Scripter, Game Tester
  • Game Technology: Game Programmer, Engine Programmer, Tools Programmer, A.I. Programmer 

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